Not without a fight: standing up against the Global Gag Rule

Health is a Human Right

An editorial co-authored by Laura Ferguson, associate director of the Program on Global Health & Human Rights, reflects on the impact that President Donald Trump’s restoration of the Global Gag Rule will have on women across the world, as well as those working to protect reproductive rights. Continue reading Not without a fight: standing up against the Global Gag Rule

Monitoring HIV-Related Laws and Policies: Lessons for AIDS and Global Health in Agenda 2030

The National Commitments and Policy Instrument (NCPI) has been used to monitor AIDS-related laws and policies for more than a decade. In this publication, USC Program on Global Health & Human Rights Director Sofia Gruskin and co-authors identify five areas that should be included in the next iteration of the NCPI and justify that its approach is relevant to participatory monitoring of targets in the health and other goals of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

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Details:

Authors: Torres A., Gruskin, S., Buse, K., Erkkola, T., Bendaud, V., Alfvén, T.
Published By: AIDS and Behavior
Date: January 2017
Publication Link: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10461-016-1621-5

Human Rights, Gender, and Infectious Disease: From HIV/AIDS to Ebola

Health is a Right

The HIV/AIDS, Ebola and Zika crises have revealed that infectious disease does not affect all global citizens equally. Among the many factors at play in making some people more vulnerable than others are human rights and gender equality. Continue reading Human Rights, Gender, and Infectious Disease: From HIV/AIDS to Ebola

No “Shared Governance” Without Attention to Law, Broadly Concevied

In this commentary published Sept. 21 in The American Journal of Bioethics, Alexander Capron and Sofia Gruskin call attention to law at the national and international levels as a necessary component of “shared health governance” among health research consortia.

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Details:

Authors: Alexander Capron and Sofia Gruskin
Published By: The American Journal of Bioethics
Date: September 21, 2016
Publication Link:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15265161.2016.1214332

Non-communicable diseases and human rights: Global synergies, gaps and opportunities

Global Public Health

The incorporation of human rights in health policy and programmes is known to strengthen responses to health problems and help address disparities created or exacerbated by illness yet this remains underexplored in relation to non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Aiming to understand existing synergies and how they might be further strengthened, we assessed the extent to which human rights are considered in global NCD policies and strategies and the degree of attention given to NCDs by select United Nations human rights mechanisms. Across global NCD policies and strategies, rhetorical assertions regarding human rights appear more often than actionable statements, thus limiting their implementation and impact. Although no human rights treaty explicitly mentions NCDs, some human rights monitoring mechanisms have been paying increasing attention to NCDs. This provides important avenues for promoting the incorporation of human rights norms and standards into NCD responses as well as for accountability. Linking NCDs and human rights at the global level is critical for encouraging national-level action to promote better outcomes relating to both health and human rights. The post-2015 development agenda constitutes a key entry point for highlighting these synergies and strengthening opportunities for health and rights action at global, national and local levels.

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Authors: Laura Ferguson, Daniel Tarantola, Michael Hoffmann, Sofia Gruskin
Published By: Global Public Health
Date: March 28, 2016
Publication Link: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17441692.2016.1158847

Reproductive justice & preventable deaths: State funding, family planning, abortion, and infant mortality, US 1980–2010

Professor Sofia Gruskin and co-authors published a new article April 22 in Social Science and Medicine Public Health titled Reproductive justice & preventable deaths: State family planning, abortion & infant mortality 1980-2010.” The article explores the current lack of research that can be used to examine associations between infant mortality and US state funding for family planning services, with particular attention to growing efforts to restrict reproductive rights and services and documented associations between unintended pregnancy and infant mortality. The data presented in the article underscore the need for adequate public funding for abortion services and for redressing health inequities.

 

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Authors: Nancy Krieger, Sofia Gruskin, Nakul Singh, Mathew V. Kiang, Jarvis T. Chen, Pamela D. Waterman, Jason Beckfield, Brent A. Coull
Published By: SSM – Population Health
Date: March 19, 2016
Publication Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352827316300064

Non-Communicable Diseases and Human Rights: Global Synergies, Gaps and Opportunities

Global Public Health

A new article in Global Public Health, published by professors Laura Ferguson and Sofia Gruskin, along with co-authors, identifies that the incorporation of human rights in health policy and programs remains under-explored in relation to non-communicable diseases.

Aiming to understand existing synergies and how they might be further strengthened, “Non-Communicable Diseases and Human Rights: Global Synergies, Gaps and Opportunities” assesses the extent to which human rights are considered in global NCD policies and strategies and the degree of attention given to NCDs by select United Nations human rights mechanisms.

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Details:

Authors: Laura Ferguson, Daniel Tarantola, Michael Hoffmann & Sofia Gruskin
Published By: Global Public Health
Date: March 28, 2016
Publication Link: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17441692.2016.1158847#.VxUyrZMrIUE

“Health and Human Rights: Overview,” in the Reference Module in Biomedical Sciences

Reference Module in Biomedical Sciences

Human rights add value to the concrete work of public health in myriad ways. Of the institutions and individuals engaged in these efforts some take health as an entry point, others take human rights but no one approach has primacy over all others. Despite this diversity, the frameworks within which they operate can be generally assigned to four broad categories: advocacy, legal, policy, and programs. In this article we attempt to set out what application of these concepts has meant to date in practice, discuss the application of ‘rights-based’ approaches to health, and suggest issues for further consideration.

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Details:

Editor-in-Chief: Michael J. Caplan
Editorial Board:
 Walter F. Boron, Emile L. Boulpaep, Ralph A. Bradshaw, David B. Bylund, Bruce M. Carlson, S.J. Enna, Ilpo Huhtaniemi, Shashikant “Shashi” Kulkarni, Brian W.J. Mahy, Luciano Martini, Linda M. McManus, Charlene A. McQueen, Rick Mitchell, Roger J. Narayan, Stella R. Quah, George B. Richerson, Philip D. Stahl, Yi-Wei Tang, Katherine L. Tucker
Authors: Sofia Gruskin, Daniel Tarantola
Published By: Elsevier
Date: February 9, 2016
Publication Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128012383988354

Strengthening Regional and National Legislative Environments to Support the Human Rights of LGBT People and Women and Girls affected by HIV and AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Case Study of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Project background: The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Regional Centre for Africa designed and implemented a project entitled ‘Strengthening Regional and National Legislative Environments to Support the Human Rights of LGBT People and Women and Girls affected by HIV and AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa’. The project was initially conceptualized as an 11- country project, occurring between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2015.1 Within the context of countries’ international human rights commitments, the project’s aim was to provide a comprehensive approach towards strengthening legal environments, with an emphasis on reducing the HIV-related vulnerability of LGBT people and women and girls affected by HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa. Key partners included governments; civil society and community-based organisations; legal experts and members of the judiciary; networks of people living with HIV, and those most at risk of HIV; regional economic communities (e.g. Southern African Development Community – SADC); and the African Union Commission (AUC).

Case study background: The Program on Global Health and Human Rights at the University of Southern California’s Institute for Global Health conducted a mid-term evaluation (MTE) of this project. The MTE was conducted with attention to UNDP’s theory of change, standard evaluation criteria relating to relevance, effectiveness, and sustainability, and with additional attention to the human rights principles of inclusion, participation, equality, non-discrimination, and accountability.2 Documents were reviewed using a data extraction tool designed specifically for the MTE and primary qualitative data were collected through semistructured key informant interviews. 3 Outputs from the document review, data extraction, and qualitative interviews were analysed jointly.

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Details:

Authors: Laura Ferguson, Ian Henry, Alexandra Nicholson, Sofia Gruskin
Published By: Program on Global Health and Human Rights, Institute for Global Health, University of Southern California
Date: December 1, 2015
Publication Link: Download the article [PDF] »