Vanessa Kerry FlyerSeptember 9, 2015 —Seed Global Health began as an idea borne from a familiar global health quandary: How to strengthen health education and care delivery in countries where health professionals are scarce?

Today the non-profit is successful and growing. It has sent more than 100 U.S. volunteers to Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda to build healthcare capacity and leverages partnerships, including the Peace Corps, to meet the countries’ long-term health care and human resource needs. The only organization working in this needed space, Seed provides expertise in medical and nursing education as well as loan forgiveness to support volunteers’ service.

This talk reviewed how Seed evolved from an idea to its current implementation. Co-Founder and CEO Dr. Vanessa Kerry also discussed how her career both helped—and was impacted by—guiding Seed to fruition.

For more information about Seed Global Health, visit seedglobalhealth.org.

This lecture and lunch were co-sponsored by the USC Institute for Global Health and GlobeMed at USC.

Vanessa Kerry

Co-Founder & CEO
Seed Global Health

Dr. Vanessa Kerry is the co-founder and CEO of Seed Global Health (Seed), a non-profit that deploys health professionals as educators to resource limited countries to build a pipeline of in-country providers and educators, strengthen healthcare capacity, and provide a new type of global diplomacy. She helped establish Seed’s flagship program, the Global Health Service Partnership, a public-private partnership between Seed, the Peace Corps, the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and partner countries.

Dr. Kerry is also a critical care physician at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Associate Director of Partnerships and Global Initiatives at MGH Global Health. She spearheads Harvard Medical School’s program in Global Public Policy and Social Change. She graduated from Yale University summa cum laude, Harvard Medical School cum laude, and earned her Master’s in Health Policy, Planning, and Financing from the London Schools of Economics and of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

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