November 17, 2016

Global Health Corps is a leadership development organization devoted to recruiting and training emerging leaders in global health equity. In this lecture three GHC alumni discussed what leadership means in the current global health landscape and the need for new voices and perspectives, including non-traditional backgrounds, in moving the needle on some of the world’s most complex challenges. Panelists shared insights from their experiences as fellows and their work in global health and social justice since then. Moderator Jessica Mack shared more on the organization’s vision for a new global health leadership paradigm, as well as how to get involved.

GHC provides opportunities for young professionals from diverse backgrounds to work on the frontlines of the fight for global health equity in Eastern Africa, Southern Africa and the United States. United by the belief that health is a human right, the GHC community is nearly 750-strong and is the changing the face of leadership in global health.

Learn more about Global Health Corp:
Website: ghcorps.org


Panelists

img_0687Effie-Ann Forson 
2015-16 Global Health Corps Fellow at the Clinton Health Access Initiative in Zambia

 

Effie-Ann Forson was born in Los Angeles, California. She completed her undergraduate degree at University of California, Davis majoring in nutrition science, where she worked at a student-run free healthcare clinic delivering primary care to the underserved African-American population. Effie later moved to New York City to complete her master’s degree in public health at the City University of New York at Hunter College where she focused on food insecurity in low-income urban minority populations. In 2015, Effie traveled to Lusaka, Zambia as a Global Health Corps Fellow with the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI). While at CHAI, she and her partner led and assessed a country-level feasibility study related to the provision of a fortified complementary food product for infants 6-24 months of age with the goal of reducing the prevalence of stunting in Zambia. This challenging, yet fulfilling experience triggered her interest in the application of business aspects as a solution to pressing public health issues

Chad NobleChad Noble-Tabiolo
Clinical Laboratory Scientist, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital
2014-15 Global Health Corps Fellow, Centre for Youth Empowerment and Civic Education in Malawi

Chad Noble-Tabiolo is a licensed Clinical Laboratory Scientist at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Benioff Children’s Hospital. Additionally, Chad works as a consultant with a non-profit organization called Map Your World, where he works on programs that aim to empower and engage youth from underserved communities on social and health issues using geographical information systems (GIS) technology and storytelling. Recently, he worked as the Partnerships Coordinator with the HEAL Initiative at UCSF. He earned a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Clinical Laboratory Science from Saint Louis University and a Master’s in Public Health from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, graduating with the inaugural class in the Native Hawaiian and Indigenous Health specialization. Chad began his passion for health in biomedical research as a post-baccalaureate fellow at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland and as a medical technologist at the Kapiʻolani Medical Center for Women and Children in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi. This passion later grew into a commitment towards global health equity and social justice, as he worked on capacity building of laboratorians in Cap Haitian, Haiti with Randolph World Ministries; and on youth and child rights as a Program Manager in an informal settlement community in Laguna, Philippines with Consuelo Foundation. Most recently, Chad completed a fellowship with the Global Health Corps, serving as the Monitoring & Evaluation and Communications Officer with the Centre for Youth Empowerment and Civic Education in Lilongwe, Malawi.

Sonya SoniSonya Soni
Research Associate, Partners in Health
Co-Director, Saraswati Soni Mahila Ashram
2012-13 Global Health Corps Fellow, Newark Department of Child & Family Well-Being

Sonya Soni is a research associate at Partners In Health in Boston, where she works on the endTB initiative, a global study that strives to revolutionize the treatment regimen for tuberculosis patients in impoverished communities. She also serves as the co-director of the Saraswati Soni Mahila Ashram, an NGO that addresses girls’ health and rights in Uttarakhand, India. Sonya’s focus areas include global health ethics, social justice, and child rights. She has worked between the U.S., South Asia, and East Africa for various community-based public health NGOs, including Nyaya Health, Physicians for Human Rights, and the Comprehensive Rural Health Project Jamkhed. Sonya was a 2012-13 Global Health Corps health policy fellow, where she was placed at the Newark Department of Child & Family Well-Being. Sonya completed her B.S. in Health Promotion & Disease Prevention and a Master’s of Public Health from the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine, where she was named an Albert Schweitzer fellow. She pursued a second master’s degree studying medical anthropology at Harvard University, where she served as a teaching fellow for global health expert Dr. Paul Farmer. Sonya was selected as a Cultural Bridge fellow for the Harvard Kennedy School of Government’s Women & Public Policy Program in rural Nepal, a Harvard Hauser Center for Non-profit Organizations fellow, and a Harvard Humanitarian Initiative fellow in Kashmir.

Andrew PetersonAndrew Peterson
CEO & Co-Founder, Signal Sciences
2009-10 Global Health Corps fellow, Clinton Foundation in Tanzania

Andrew Peterson is the CEO and Cofounder of Signal Sciences (www.signalsciences.com), an information security company focusing on attack detection and protection for websites and mobile applications. Previously he led a multidisciplinary product development group at Etsy focused on global growth. Prior to Etsy he worked in Tanzania with the Clinton Foundation as a Global Health Corps Fellow to improve the data quality of the Tanzanian National Health Information System. Before the Clinton Foundation, Andrew worked with Google’s AdSense and AdX sales and product teams in Mountain View, CA. He holds a B.A. in Science, Technology, and Society from Stanford University with an emphasis on Human Computer Interaction through the Stanford Design School.

Moderator

Jessica MackJessica Mack
Senior Director of Advocacy & Communications, Global Health Corps

 

Jessica Mack is Global Health Corps’ (GHC) Senior Director for Advocacy and Communications. In that role, she is responsible for leading the organization’s communications and advocacy strategies, including media, social media, and digital, new fellow recruitment and public engagement. Jess also works intensively with fellows and alumni throughout GHC’s 600-strong global community to develop their voices as advocates and young global health leaders. Before joining GHC, Jess was a Program Officer on the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s global tobacco control policy and advocacy team. Prior to, she spent several years as a consultant in advocacy and communications for global women’s rights and health with such clients as UN Women, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, IPPF, Women Deliver, and Ipas. Previously, she was a Manager at Global Health Strategies and Program Officer for Communications and Learning at Planned Parenthood Global. Jess has lived and worked across Africa and Southeast Asia, and written widely on gender and development-related topics. She has a Bachelor’s from Boston University and a Master of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School. Until recently relocating to Los Angeles, she sat on the Board of Directors for The CAIR Project and Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands.

Lecture