Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016

Despite efforts to create a tobacco-free generation, the tobacco industry continues to target adolescents and young adults. In this lecture, Jonathan Klein, associate executive director of the American Academy of Pediatrics and executive director of NCD Child, described usage and cessation trends associated with cigarettes and other tobacco products, as well emerging evidence on the health impact of electronic cigarettes. From smoke-free public housing and movies to raising the legal minimum sales age, he addressed policy initiatives to promote reduction or elimination of youth initiation, protect children and other non-smokers from secondhand tobacco smoke exposure, and improve quit attempts.

Jonathan KleinJonathan Klein

Associate Executive Director, American Academy of Pediatrics
Founding Director, Julius B. Richmond Center of Excellence
Executive Director, NCD Child

Dr. Jonathan D. Klein is Associate Executive Director of the AAP, and founding Director of the AAP Julius B. Richmond Center, a national center of excellence dedicated to eliminating childrens’ exposure to tobacco and secondhand smoke. Dr. Klein is an expert in adolescent medicine and child and adolescent health services research. His research addresses tobacco prevention and control, access and quality of care, obesity screening in primary care, and other child and adolescent preventive services.

Dr. Klein attended Brandeis University, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, and the Harvard School of Public Health. He completed his residency in pediatrics and a chief residency at the Boston Floating Hospital, New England Medical Center, and was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He joined the University of Rochester faculty in 1992 where he served as Associate Chair for Community and Government Affairs in the Department of Pediatrics and as Professor of Pediatrics, Preventive and Community Medicine, and Family Medicine. He joined the Academy as Associate Executive Director in 2009, where his current oversight responsibilities include research, tobacco control, policy, and international health. He also serves as Executive Director of NCD Child, a global advocacy coalition dedicated to inclusion of children and youth in NCD prevention and treatment agendas.

This lecture was part of the 2016-2017 USC Global Health Lecture Series and hosted by the USC Institute for Global Health.

Lecture