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Addressing the Long-Term Social and Economic Impacts of Dobbs: A View from Inside USC

November 16 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Free

The USC Institute on Inequalities in Global Health, in partnership with the USC Law & Global Health Collaboration and USC Keck School of Medicine Center for Gender Equity in Medicine and Science, invites you to join us for “Addressing the Long-Term Social and Economic Impacts of Dobbs: A View from Inside USC” on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 4–5 p.m. PST.

This one-hour virtual event brings together a multidisciplinary panel of faculty from across USC to discuss the broad social and economic implications of the US Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization. Informed by the outcomes of the midterm elections in which abortion is a central issue, USC experts in the fields of law, medicine, social work, sociology and global health will provide insight into the current political landscape and the potential long-term ramifications for marginalized and vulnerable communities. This forward-looking conversation will draw on the wide expertise of the panelists to consider the concept of solidarity and explore strategies for research and advocacy in this complicated time.

Speakers:

  • Manuel Pastor, Director, USC Dornsife Equity Research Institute; Distinguished Professor, Sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity, USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences
  • Parveen Parmar, Chief, Global Emergency Medicine; Director, Center for Gender Equity in Medicine and Science; Associate Professor, Clinical Emergency Medicine, USC Keck School of Medicine
  • Daria Roithmayr, Richard L. and Antoinette S. Kirtland Professor of Law, USC Gould School of Law
  • John Blosnich, Director, Center for LGBTQ+ Health Equity; Assistant Professor, USC Dworak-Peck School of Social Work

 

Register here!

Venue

Virtual
Virtual

Organizer

USC Institute on Inequalities in Global Health
Email:
global.health@usc.edu
View Organizer Website